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Oh My English

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   Oh My English

Oh My English

Inspirational Monday motivation quote to start your week right!

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Give yourself a break on a Sunday – make a concerted effort to do something fun. Watch your favorite movie, cook your favorite dish, or read a good book that you have no time to read during the weekdays. Do whatever makes you happy and you’ll see the great golden clasp in life is the impact that does what you like will make on your happiness.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

What would life be without balance? Whether we like to admit it or not, some of our personality traits are also likely to be negative. Here is a list of negative adjectives that may describe aspects of personalities from time to time: Arrogant Quarrelsome Boorish Rude Bossy Sarcastic Conceited Self-centered Cowardly Slovenly Dishonest Sneaky Finicky Stingy Impulsive Sullen Lazy Surly Malicious Thoughtless Obnoxious Unfriendly Picky Unruly Pompous Vulgar

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Some, if not most, of your personality traits are likely to be positive. Here is a list of positive adjectives that can help you describe personality traits: Adventurous Helpful Affable Humble Capable Imaginative Charming Impartial Confident Independent Conscientious Keen Cultured Meticulous Dependable Observant Discreet Optimistic Dutiful Persistent Encouraging Precise Exuberant Reliable Fair Sociable Fearless Trusting Gregarious Valiant

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Why Do People Use Slang? Because slang terms are often only understood by people in a certain group, using slang is, above all, a way to show that you belong. You show that you're one of the crowd by using terms that others don't understand, and you can connect with like-minded people who understand just what you mean by using the latest slang terms. For this reason, slang is often a mark of being "cool," or at least in the know about something. People who are "in" with a group know the slang, and people who aren't don't. Slang is, therefore, a way to use language to separate yourself from others. The best example of this is the way each generation of teens uses new slang to separate themselves from their tragically uncool parents. Examples of Modern Slang BAE: A term of endearment, meaning "before anyone else," used between romantic partners that can also be used between close friends. "Bae, you're the best." Coin: Another way to refer to money. "She's about to earn some major coin." Dying: Something that was so funny, you died laughing. "OMG. This standup is hilarious. I'm dying." Epic: If somewhat was "epic," it was highly enjoyable. "His latest novel was epic." Low key: If someone or something is "low key," it means it's being done under the radar or they don't want anyone to know. "I low key love Imagine Dragons, but don't tell anyone!" Salty: Angry or bitter about something. "Why are you so salty? I said I would share if I win the lottery." Ship: Short for "romantic relationship," sometimes used as a verb. "Everyone wants to ship Edward and bella, but they say they're just good friends. YOLO: An acronym for "you only live once," encouraging people to seize the day. "Of course you should go on that trip to Dublin! YOLO!

   Oh My English

Oh My English

He lost the plot. On the surface this seems to mean that someone has lost sight of an argument or the point they were making, but in practice it's more about losing one's cool or good judgment. It's commonly heard in sporting situations when an athlete blows a play or when someone starts a fight. Example: The day of her wedding, I thought Amy was going to lose the plot.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Run amok / amuck Meaning: To behave or run around in a wild, unruly, out-of-control manner; to be crazy or chaotic. Example: We tried to have some organized games for the kids, but as soon as they all got here they started running amok. Origin: This expression comes from the Malaysian word amoq. When translated literally it describes the behaviour of tribesmen who, under the influence of opium, became wild and attacked anybody in their path. During the 17th century, the phrase became popular in England when travellers would try to impress people with their knowledge of foreign cultures.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

At the end of the day, the most important thing is that you were able to give yourself a break from a week’s workload.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Americans write dates in the order month, day, year. In British English, the date is written day, month, year, going from smallest unit of time to largest. If you’re working with people from different areas, it’s probably easiest to write out the month to avoid confusion! Example: 12/11/17 US: Month/Day/Year December 11, 2017 UK: Day/Month/Year 12 November 2017

   Oh My English

Oh My English

1. Use a comma to separate items in a list of nouns. If you have more than two nouns, you need to separate them with commas. In a list of nouns, you will also separate the final two with the word "and" or the word "or" like this: Janet went to the store to buy pasta, broccoli, lemons, and beans. 2. In a string of two or more adjectives use a comma. If the adjectives come before the noun, don't use "and." You only need to use "and" in a list of adjectives if the list comes after the verb "to be." Look at the following sentences: I have a big, old, warm quilt on my bed. 3. Don't separate a subject from its verb with a comma. Even if the subject is very long and you feel a comma is needed to allow the reader to pause for breath, don't do it. The president of the largest company in North America and his most trusted and esteemed board of advisors (no comma here) wish to see you immediately. 4. Use a comma to separate clauses, both dependent and independent. As in the first rule, the final comma is not necessary in a string of dependent clauses. However, as the clauses get longer, leaving out that last comma can get confusing, so it is often better to put it in just to clear things up: Betty walks to work every day, talks to clients, makes appointments, eats lunch, has afternoon meetings, and walks back home. 5. Use a comma to set off a non-defining subordinate clause or an appositive. A non-defining subordinate clause gives some information about a noun, but the information is not necessary for identifying that particular noun. These clauses usually begin with "which" or "who." The Empire State Building, which was built in 1930, is still New York's tallest building.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

If you want your audience to understand your message, your language must be simple and clear. Use short words and short sentences. Do not use jargon, unless you are certain that your audience understands it. In general, talk about concrete facts rather than abstract ideas. Use active verbs instead of passive verbs. Active verbs are much easier to understand. They are much more powerful.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

STEP #1: Easy English If you’re a beginner and you have trouble understanding, start by watching more simple YouTube videos or podcasts for English learners. STEP #2: Your Native Language Subtitles Most of you are already beyond the beginner level, so we recommend starting by watching one TV episode that you really like with your native language subtitles. This is helpful because you can get to know the characters and the plot (the story) first. STEP #3: English Subtitles After you understand the characters and plot and feel familiar with the episode, watch it again with English subtitles. This is the step that might take the longest. STEP #4: No Subtitles! The final step, of course, is to watch the same episode without any subtitles. Maybe you won’t understand every joke or every expression, but the goal is to understand at least 70% of the story without using subtitles.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Bottoms Up Meaning Definition: Drink! People will say, “bottoms up” to encourage others to drink something. If you are holding a cup full of liquid and lift it to your mouth to drink, you are raising the cup so that the bottom can be seen, thus bringing the bottom up. Most often, people will say this as a joyful cheer when drinking alcohol. Someone in a group may shout “bottoms up” as the group all takes a shot of liquor. Somewhat less frequently, people will use this phrase to encourage drinking something unpleasant. If you have medicine that tastes bad but will help you to get better, your doctor may say “bottoms up” as you drink it. Origin: During the 18th and 19th centuries, English Navy recruiters would coerce London drinkers in dockside pubs to join the service. Accepting the ‘King’s shilling’ was proof that an agreement had been made to join the service. Dishonest recruiters would slip a shilling into the pint of a drunken man who wouldn’t notice until he had finished his beverage. The victim would then be dragged away and wake up on board a ship far out to sea, unaware of what had happened to him the night before. When drinkers and pubs became aware of the scam, they introduced tankards with transparent bases. Customers were reminded to lift the pint up and check the bottom for illicit shillings before they began drinking.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

M - monday 😊

   Oh My English

Oh My English

"Do you guys want to get together sometime soon?" "We should all hang out outside of work." "What does everyone think of getting something to eat after swing lessons one day?" "Maybe we could all check out that new restaurant before we all get busy with exams." "I'm thinking of having some people over this Friday. What do you guys think?" "Does everyone want to go to 80's Night at (some club) this Saturday?" "There's a fair coming to town this weekend. Who's up for it?" "Anyone feel like coming back to my place now? We could play some video games or watch a movie or something." "Do you guys want to go downtown after class gets out?"

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Reading the numbers – the number 0 “Zero” is the technically correct way to say the number “0”, but English speakers will often say “oh” like the letter O when reading numbers. That’s why James Bond, Agent 007, is called “double-oh seven”! Groups of numbers that end in multiple 0s are usually read as a single number.    Example:    +44 7402 302405    US and UK:    Plus 44, seven four oh two, three oh two four oh five    Example:    1-800-282-3000    US and UK:    One, eight hundred, two eight two, three thousand

   Oh My English

Oh My English

At the office ✅ Looking forward to the weekend? Have you worked here long? I can't believe how busy/quiet we are today, can you? Has it been a long week? You look like you could use a cup of coffee. What do you think of the new computers? At a social event ✅ So, how do you know Justin? Have you tried the cabbage rolls that Sandy made? Are you enjoying yourself? It looks like you could use another drink. Pretty nice place, huh? I love your dress. Can I ask where you got it? Out for a walk ✅ How old's your baby? What's your puppy's name? The tulips are sure beautiful at this time of year, aren't they. How do you like the new park? Nice day to be outside, isn't it?

   Oh My English

Oh My English

When punctuation is parallel it means that interrupting the main clause with a dash or a comma requires the same punctuation at both the beginning and end of the clause. Incorrect: The teenagers, students from Mrs. Smith's art class went on a field trip to the museum. Correct: The teenagers, students from Mrs. Smith's art class, went on a field trip to the museum. Correct: The teenagers-students from Mrs. Smith's art class went on a field trip to the museum. This rule also means that you should not use a semicolon to set off just one item in a list. Incorrect: I have lived in Des Moines, Iowa, Seattle, Washington; and Boise, Idaho. Correct: I have lived in Des Moines, Iowa; Seattle, Washington; and Boise, Idaho.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Eat humble pie Meaning: To admit that one is wrong, usually when doing so triggers great embarrassment or shame. Example: Ugh, now that my idea has failed, I'll have to eat humble pie in the board meeting tomorrow. Origin:  In the 14th century during a post-hunt feast, the lord of the manor would eat the finest cuts of meat. The numbles was the name given to the heart, liver, and entrails of animals. By the 15th century, this was shortened to ‘umbles. It was common practice for people of lower stature to be humiliated when served the ‘umbles baked into a pie. Thus, comes the term, ‘to eat humble pie’.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Monday motivation post to start your week on the right note 😊

   Oh My English

Oh My English

5 steps to a productive Sunday ☀️ ✅ Wake up early ✅ Get some fresh air ✅ Set a schedule ✅ Make time for yourself ✅Be goal-oriented

   Oh My English

Oh My English

“The more that you read, the more that you’ll know. The more that you know, the more places you’ll go.” – Dr. Seuss. Being able to read a book in another language and understand it is a huge achievement. You’ll feel accomplished the moment you read that final page, close the book, and reflect on the experience. Check out some of the following well-known books. If you’ve got a basic level of understanding and comprehension, these books aren’t going to be a problem. Set yourself a reading challenge! Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman This is a longer novel for teens, written in fairly simple language, which means it is easier to understand if you’re just learning English. This will help build basic vocabulary and is a great book to increase your comprehension skills before you advance to a higher reading level. Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl This is great for beginners or low intermediate because it’s a fun, simple story. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie This popular non-fiction book gives useful advice and interesting stories about how to be kind and influential at the same time.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

✅"Do you want to grab coffee/a drink some time?" ✅"Do you want to go for a bike ride one day?" ✅"We should go check out that new store some time." ✅"Do you want to meet up to work out together one day?" ✅"What days are you usually free? Want to hang out sometime?" ✅"We should get together outside of this class some time."

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Talking about the weather 🌧🌤 Conversation Starters: Beautiful day, isn't it? Can you believe all of this rain we've been having? It looks like it's going to snow. It sure would be nice to be in Hawaii right about now. I hear they're calling for thunderstorms all weekend. We couldn't ask for a nicer day, could we? How about this weather? Did you order this sunshine? A: What is the weather going to be like today? B: It looks like it's going to rain. A: Oh no! I thought it was going to be nice. B: The forecast said it's going to be rainy and cold all weekend. A: We were going to have a BBQ, but maybe we should do it another time. B: The weather has been really unpredictable lately.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Hack #1: Read Quick...Then Study Don't concentrate on understanding every word when you read something. Read it first to understand the general concept. Then, go back and concentrate on the specific words that you don't understand. Hack #2: Build your vocabulary by learning prefixes and suffixes. These parts of speech change the meaning of root words. Examples: Root word - happy Root word + prefix - unhappy Root word + suffix - happiest Hack #3: Practice, practice, practice. The more you speak, the more comfortable you will become speaking English. Tokport.com is ready to help you!

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Bee’s knees 🐝 When bees flit from flower to flower the nectar sticks to their legs. The phrase "bee's knees" means sweet and good, because the knees of the bee are where all the sweet, good stuff is collected. Example: You bought me a coffee? You're the bee's knees! Meaning: Excellence or perfection. Origin: In 1920s America there was a relatively short-lived trend which involved the pairing of an animal with a body part. That craze spawned a plethora of expressions including elephant’s adenoids, cat’s miaow, ant’s pants, tiger’s spots, elephant’s wrist, eel’s ankles, and bullfrog’s beard just to name a few. Today only three such expressions survived such as bee’s knees, cat’s pajamas, and dog’s bollocks.

   Oh My English

Oh My English

Monday motivation quotes to boost your spirits 💫